Tag Archives: Dining with Outlaws

Mushroom Pizza with Truffles

Mushroom Pizza with Truffles

Mushroom Pizza with Truffles

Take your love for pizza to the next level and indulge in this recipe that’s inspired by the pizza trending in Italy that’s packed with mushrooms with a touch of white truffles!

Mushroom Pizza with Truffles

By Rina Oh

Sevings: 4

Time: 1 hour 40 minutes

Ingredients

  • Basic Pizza Dough:
  • 3/4 cup lukewarm water
  • 1 tablespoon active dry yeast
  • 2 cups all purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • Mushroom Pizza:
  • 6 cremini mushrooms
  • 2 cups oyster mushrooms
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 8 ounces mozzarella cheese
  • ½ cup ricotta cheese
  • 2 tablespoons white truffle oil

Directions

  1. Combine lukewarm water, yeast, and sugar; let stand for 5 minutes.
  2. Brush large bowl lightly with olive oil. Mix 2 cups flour, sugar, and salt in processor.; add yeast mixture and 3 tablespoons oil, process until the dough forms a sticky ball; knead dough with your hands for about 5 minutes. Form into a ball and transfer to a bowl covered with olive oil; cover bowl with a wet towel and allow dough to rise in a warm area for about 2 hours.
  3. Heat a non-stick frying pan on high heat for 2 minutes. Add the vegetable oil and heat for another minute. Saute the Oyster mushrooms in the pan on high heat, moving the mushrooms frequently until they are browned, for about 5 minutes. Season with salt and pepper to taste.
  4. Split pizza dough in half.
  5. Preheat oven to 400°F (200°C). Split pizza dough in half.
  6. Using 2 small 9” pizza pans, spread about a tablespoon of olive oil to coat each pan. Form a ball with one half of the dough and spread out using your fingers. Push dough with your fingers until it reaches ends of the pan. If you are using a sheet tray, do not divide the dough in half. Spread the dough into a rectangular shape.
  7. Add mozzarella cheese. Spread it evenly. Scoop some ricotta cheese with a spoon and place on top of the mozzarella cheese.
  8. Place Oyster mushrooms over mozzarella cheese.
  9. Place Cremini mushrooms over Oyster mushrooms. Top with extra mozzarella cheese. Drizzle with White Truffle oil and season with salt and pepper.
  10. Place pizza in oven at for 10 to 12 minutes, until the crust is a golden brown color.
  11. Remove from oven and slice the pizza into eight pieces using a pizza slicer or a sharp knife.

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Filed under American Food, Dining with Outlaws, Meatless Mondays, Pizza, Recipes, Vegetarian

Matcha Angel Food Cake with White Bean

 

Matcha Angel Food Cake with White Bean

Matcha Angel Food Cake with White Bean

You can have your cake and eat it too without the guilt or the sugar crash with this healthy recipe that’s packed with 12 egg whites and loaded with proteins from legumes.

Matcha Angel Food Cake with White Bean

By Rina Oh

Servings: 8

Time: 2 hours

Ingredients

  • 12 egg whites
  • 2 tablespoons water
  • 1 teaspoons cream of tartar
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 2 cups confectioners sugar
  • 1 cup cake flour
  • 3 teaspoons Matcha powder
  • 6 cups cooked white beans
  • 1 cup confectioners sugar
  • 2 tablespoons coconut sugar

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 350°F (180°C).
  2. Using a hand mixer with the balloon whisk attachment, combine egg whites with cream of tartar, water, and vanilla extract and whip for 5 minutes on medium speed until the mixture reaches the soft peak stage. Slowly add small amounts of the confectioners sugar until it’s all incorporated for 1 minute. Increase the speed to medium-high and continue mixing for 3 more minutes. Turn down the speed to medium-low speed and slowly add the cake flour in batches of 2 tablespoons. When the flour is all in, allow the dry flour to blend with egg mixture and increase the speed of mixer again to high speed for 2 minutes.
  3. Transfer batter into a deep dish non stick pan (do not grease the pan). Shake the pan back and forth to even out the surface.
  4. Place pan into oven and bake for 35 minutes or until cake tester comes out clean.
  5. Using a blender combine beans and confectioners sugar and pulse for 1 minute. Increase the speed and blend on high speed for 2 minutes until the mixture is pureed.
  6. Take cake out the oven when it’s finished baking and place on a cooling rack for an hour. Gently remove the cake from the pan and place on a cutting board. Using a cake knife, slice cake horizontally in the middle.
  7. To assemble, place one piece of the cake, with the crust down and soft side up. Spoon half the bean filling onto the first layer of the cake, allow some of the filling to drip off the sides. Place second layer on top with the soft green side up. Repeat the same step. Top cake with coconut sugar.
  8. Divide cake into 8 pieces and serve.

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Filed under Beans and Legumes, Dessert, Dining with Outlaws, Food for Kids, French, High Tea, Hot on the Blog, Korean, Recipes, Vegetarian

Korean Kimchi Mung Bean Pancakes

 

Korean Kimchi Mung Bean Pancakes

Korean Kimchi Mung Bean Pancakes

Detoxify your body while eating these Mung bean pancakes packed with superfood ingredients. This savory pancake is served with a side of dressed up soy sauce, you can eat it this way or straight up. It’s jammed packed with a complete balance of proteins in the grains combined with legumes. You can skip the meat and still get every nutrient your body needs!

Korean Kimchi Mung Bean Pancakes

By Rina Oh

Servings: 4

Time: 20 Minutes

Ingredients

  • 1 cup shelled and split mungbeans rehydrated in water
  • 2 tablespoons cornstarch
  • 1 egg
  • 1 ¼ cup white flour
  • 2 cups water
  • 4 bunches of scallions
  • ½ cup kimchi, chopped
  • ¼ cup sunflower or safflower oil

Directions

  1. In a food processor, pulse the mungbeans until they are broken down and still grainy for about 30 seconds.
  2. Add egg, cornstarch, flour, and water and continue pulsing for 30 more seconds. Alternately, put the ingredients into a deep bowl or pot and blend with an immersion blender until smooth.
  3. Transfer batter into a bowl, add scallions with kimchi and stir using a spatula.
  4. Heat a nonstick pan on the stovetop for a minute on high heat. Add vegetable oil and let it heat for another 30 seconds.
  5. Add about two ladles of pancake mixture and evenly spread it out using a spatula. Use the spatula to even out the sides of the pancake. You may add some oil around the sides of the pancake at this point. Move the pan around to prevent the pancake from sticking to the pan, as the batter absorbs the oil. Cook for about two minutes.
  6. Flip the pancake and repeat the steps above.
  7. You will know the pancake is finished when it gets brown and crispy.
  8. Remove from heat and transfer to a cutting board. Slice the pancake with a sharp knife into eight wedges like a pizza. Serve with soy sauce on the side.

Tip: For best results and time efficiency, soak the mungbeans overnight in the refrigerator. Mungbeans can be purchased in Asian markets and whole nutrition markets. Thanks to the internet, you can also order them online!

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Filed under Dining with Outlaws, Hot on the Blog, Korean, Korean Food at Home, Recipes, Vegan, Vegetarian

Korean Japchae (Stir-Fried Vermicelli with Vegetables)

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Brighten your culinary palate with this noodle dish traditionally served at large banquets. Korean restaurants offer this popular dish as an appetizer. It’s also a great way to use any leftovers you may have!

Korean Japchae (Stir-Fried Vermicelli with Vegetables)

By Rina Oh

Ingredients

  • ¼ cup sunflower oil
  • ½ cup julienned carrots
  • 2 cups baby spinach
  • 1 cup thin-sliced shiitake mushrooms
  • 1 zucchini, julienned
  • 4 ounces boneless beef short ribs, sliced very thinly
  • 6 ounces Korean vermicelli (cellophane noodles)
  • 4 quarts water
  • 2 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 1 teaspoon sesame oil
  • 1 teaspoon sesame seeds

Directions

  1. Heat oil in a nonstick pan over high heat; add carrots, season with salt and pepper, and sauté until slightly softened, about 2 minutes. Transfer carrots to a large bowl. Repeat sauté process with spinach, mushrooms, and zucchini, respectively.
  2. Sauté beef in the remaining oil until browned completely, about 3 minutes; transfer to a cutting board and slice into thin slicers approximately the size of the vegetables.
  3. Bring water to a rolling boil in a large pot. Cook vermicelli at a boil until soft and stretchy, about 6 minutes; drain.
  4. Toss noodles with the vegetables in the bowl. Stir soy sauce, sugar, and sesame oil together in a small bowl to dissolve the sugar; pour over the noodles and vegetables and toss to coat.
  5. Divide noodles and vegetables between four bowls; garnish with sesame seeds to serve.

 

Tip: Prepare ingredients ahead of time and reserve in the refrigerator to help save time in planning healthy meals for the week! You can purchase the Korean vermicelli noodles at Asian Markets or online.

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Filed under Dining with Outlaws, Hot on the Blog, Korean, Korean Food at Home, Recipes

Korean Bulgogi Sliders

Korean Bulgogi Sliders

Korean Bulgogi Sliders

Take your sliders to the next level and add some Unami to it by marinating your protein with Korean BBQ sauce. It’s packed with flavor that is a bit different and familiar at the same time!

Korean Bulgogi Sliders

By Rina Oh

Servings: 4

Time: 2 hours

Ingredients

  • Buns:
  • ½ cup lukewarm water
  • 1 tablespoon yeast
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 1 whole egg
  • 1 tablespoon of vegetable oil
  • 2 cups all purpose flour
  • 2 teaspoons kosher salt
  • Sliders:
  • 1 pound ground beef
  • 2 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • 2 teaspoons kosher salt
  • 1 teaspoon pepper
  • 1 teaspoon rice wine vinegar
  • 2 scallions, sliced thinly

Directions

  1. Mix water and yeast with sugar and allow to proof for 5 minutes in a warm area; add egg with vegetable oil and mix thoroughly.
  2. Combine dry ingredients and add liquid mixture. Knead the dough for a few minutes. Cover and allow to rise for 1 ½ hours in a warm area.
  3. Preheat oven to 350°F (180°C).
  4. Prepare grill for direct high heat (450°F to 500°F; 230°C to 600°C).
  5. Divide dough into 8 to 10 or smaller balls if desired.
  6. Bake in the oven for 12 to 15 minutes until golden brown.
  7. Combine all the ingredients for the sliders. Form mixture into small patties.
  8. Preheat grill on high and brush the patties with vegetable oil. Place on grill and cook to desired temperature; remove patties from grill once they are cooked and allow to rest for 5 minutes.
  9. Slice buns with a serrated knife and place patties on top; garnish with scallions if desired.

Tips: For medium, cook at high temperature for 3 minutes on each side. For well done, cook at temperature for 5 minutes on each side.

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Filed under American Food, Dining with Outlaws, Food Porn, Hot on the Blog, Korean, Korean Food at Home, Recipes

Vegan Red Kidney Bean Stuffed Peppers in a Tagine

Vegan Red Kidney Bean Stuffed Peppers in a Tagine

Vegan Red Kidney Bean Stuffed Peppers in a Tagine

 

Happy Meatless Monday! Make this Indigenous Cuisine inspired vegan stuffed peppers utilizing all the spices traditionally used with ground meat recipes. I added my new favorite grain, kasha to this mixture that provides the perfect combination of complete proteins to get your body the essential nutrients it needs, craves, and wants- minus all the animals. Treat yourself to a great healthy start to the week!

 

Vegan Red Kidney Bean Stuffed Peppers in a Tagine

Recipe by Rina Oh

 

Ingredients

2 cups red kidney beans, cooked

1 cup corn kernels, cooked

1 cup kasha, cooked

1 small onion

1 cup fresh parsley

4 medium peppers

4 small tomatillos

1 roma tomato

2 jalapeno

1 teaspoon garlic ground

1 tablespoon paprika

1 teaspoon cumin ground

salt

pepper

 

 

Directions

Combine red kidney beans and parsley with paprika, salt, and garlic powder. Pulse for 30 seconds until mixture is coarsely chopped; transfer to a bowl; add kasha, corn, and toss together.

Using the same processor, combine tomatillos, roma tomato, onion, jalapeno, garlic powder, salt, and pepper. Process for about 1 minute on high speed.

Slice pepper tops off leaving about ½ inch. Remove the seeds and discard. Add stuffing mixture and press firmly down midway through. Pour tomato mixture into tagine or baking tray and cover peppers with tops. Cover the tagine with lid or baking tray with foil and bake in the oven for about 2 hours. Remove from oven and divide into four bowls. Serve immediately!

 

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Filed under Food for the Fashion People, Food Porn, Hot on the Blog, Meatless Mondays, Recipes, Uncategorized, Vegan, Vegetarian

Magical Farmstead Feast with Sprinkles of Fairy Dust

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  • Smoked Wagyu Beef Liver Pâté with Giardiniera, Toasted Hazelnuts, and Housemade Mustard
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  • JBF-1-27-2018-Tartare-05
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  • Beard House Bathroom selfies
  • Takeda Farms Reserve Wagyu Beef Crudo with Fermented Corn, Farm Radish, Smoked Foam, Red Fife Bread Crumbs, Shaved Bone Marrow, and Farm Corn Shoots
  • Chicken and Mushrooms > Chicken Sausage with Crispy Chicken Chips, Local Oyster Mushrooms, Housemade Ricotta, Salsa Verde, and Fennel Fronds
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  • Joseph Decuis Wagyu Beef Rib-Eye with Sunchoke–Chestnut Purée, Potato Confit, Farm Carrots, Spinach Purée, and Demi-Glace
  • Joseph Decuis Farm Wild Pawpaw–Persimmon Sorbet
  • Flambe the clams
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  • Banana Cream Pie with Vanilla Wafer Crust, Malibu Dulce de Leche, Pastry Cream, Toasted Meringue, and Bananas
  • MAGICAL FARMSTEAD FEAST Sat, January 27, 2018

I only write about memorable dining experiences, and this dinner from last night was certainly magical. The aura of the chefs in the kitchen filled me with so much joy, and hope that we are all doing the right thing. I sat alone near the kitchen with a nearby table full of doctors who didn’t mind my occasional blurts intruding on their conversations. We shared our love for the same meal.

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Waiting for my date to arrive in the James Beard House dining room.

Beard House Bathroom selfies

Beard House Bathroom selfies series continued…

I started taking selfies at the Beard House recently, it only makes sense. I spend on average 40-50 days out of the year here. So that’s about 6 hours times 40-50 times every year. That’s a lot of time spent in one restaurant! Why didn’t I think about doing this sooner? I should’ve taken advantage of the mirrored bathroom earlier. I love taking photos of myself making faces in different poses! Ha!

Takeda Farms Reserve Wagyu Beef Crudo with Fermented Corn, Farm Radish, Smoked Foam, Red Fife Bread Crumbs, Shaved Bone Marrow, and Farm Corn Shoots

Takeda Farms Reserve Wagyu Beef Crudo with Fermented Corn, Farm Radish, Smoked Foam, Red Fife Bread Crumbs, Shaved Bone Marrow, and Farm Corn Shoots

Getting back to the dinner last night. We had our stomachs filled with Wagyu beef from the Moon. I usually don’t like the taste of any red meat crudo, however this one sang in my mouth. It could’ve been the crisp fermented radish paired with it, with the crunchiness of the corn, and little bits of foamy stuff going in there as well.

Chicken and Mushrooms > Chicken Sausage with Crispy Chicken Chips, Local Oyster Mushrooms, Housemade Ricotta, Salsa Verde, and Fennel Fronds

Chicken and Mushrooms > Chicken Sausage with Crispy Chicken Chips, Local Oyster Mushrooms, Housemade Ricotta, Salsa Verde, and Fennel Fronds

After that we had this chicken sausage, that came with a very crispy pork skin or chicken skin? It tasted really good. The sausage itself was a bit salty- overall most of the dinner was on the saltier side. It’s meant to be consumed with all the wines I figured, although I prefer more whites and rose wine these days.

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Mangalista Pork Skin Noodles with Housemade ‘Nduja, Manila Clams, Sherry Vinegar, Cracklings, and Farm Herbs

The Mangalista Pork Skin Noodles were a big fustian mark. I wasn’t a fan of the noodles and I loved the clams in the sauce. It sang in my mouth. The clams were barely touched by fire and I watched as the chef sautéed those little guys and drowned them in white wine in a flambe afterwards.

Flambe the clams

Flambe the clams!

Joseph Decuis Wagyu Beef Rib-Eye with Sunchoke–Chestnut Purée, Potato Confit, Farm Carrots, Spinach Purée, and Demi-Glace

Joseph Decuis Wagyu Beef Rib-Eye with Sunchoke–Chestnut Purée, Potato Confit, Farm Carrots, Spinach Purée, and Demi-Glace

I felt like a real voyeur last night, one whom graduated from being a seer to a creator of something new, you now see the images of the chefs from a cook’s point of view. I started taking my shots in angles that would only come from someone who’s actually in the kitchen cooking or working the line. I started calling out “behind”, “corner”- like the good old days. I miss cooking like this.

Joseph Decuis Farm Wild Pawpaw–Persimmon Sorbet

Joseph Decuis Farm Wild Pawpaw–Persimmon Sorbet

This persimmon sorbet was everything. I’m hungry today thinking about it.

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And finally the finale was this spectacular-spectacular Banana Cream Pie with Vanilla Wafer Crust. I can still taste the crispy wafer crust and melting meringue in my mouth. I should’ve finished it last night but there’s that diet I keep talking about. Oh well- maybe I’ll really start it tomorrow.

I’m off to the market now to buy some fish for Daniel. I got a sudden urge to make brussels sprouts with a white fish and butternut squash.

Until we meet again Mr. James Beard. (Literally next week)

 

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Filed under Dinners at the James Beard House 2017, James Beard House, Restaurants, Short Ribs, The James Beard Foundation, Uncategorized

Buddhist Tea with Corinne Trang, Holistic Teacher, Yogi, Author

  • Dining with Outlaws has High Tea with Corinne Trang
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I met Corinne through the Mealthy Team whom I got a chance to work with a few months ago as their recipe editor. Corinne’s recipes caught my attention and I started following her on Instagram, and then there was a day that we needed her to resend some images, and the rest is history. I was thrilled to be invited to visit her in her home upstate. It was over an hour for me to drive there but worth the trip.

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We had a traditional Chinese gong fu tea service that lasted approximately 2 and a half hours. There were four teas that we drank, each steeped several times. You start by pouring the hot water into a vessel called “gaiwan”—meaning cup and lid—and the tiny teacups to warm them up. Then you pour out the water into a large discard bowl. Then you add the tea leaves in the gaiwan and pour water on top, pouring out the water immediately into the discard bowl again. That step rinses and awakens the leaves. This is an essential step to serving oolongs and black teas, but green teas don’t generally need rinsing. Then you add water on the wet leaves again and steep for about 5 to 10 seconds (yes that little!), depending on the tea. The infusion, referred to as “soup,” is decanted into a glass “fairness” pitcher, insuring that each serving has the same balanced flavor. Corinne generously poured every single tea, offering several steeps for each type, as the leaves can be reused several times, about 7 to 9 times on average. The experience showed her beautiful humility, acquired over time from studying Hinduism, Buddhism, and The Way of Tea.

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The first tea was green tea called “Mao Jian,” therefore not oxidized, and its 2nd and 3rd steeps were the most intense., the first just awakening the leaves. It was steeped in a gaiwan. The water used in steeping tea has a ph level of 6.5 to 7, ever so slightly acidic, like tea, to neutral.

 

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She followed that with a semi-oxidized tea (about 40%), aka “oolong,” called “Chi Ye”. It is from the Phoenix Mountains in the southern Chinese province of Guangdong. Unlike the vibrant, grassy green tea, this one had a deep floral note. She steeped that one at 93°C. The first steep was 5 seconds. We steeped it 3 times, the flavor intensifying a little more with each steep. The third steep brought out the true characteristics of this tea at its peak. In the spiritual practice of tea, Cha Dao, steeping the tea until it returns to water allows you to experience the arc of the tea all the way to the end, appreciating the journey. Corinne carries this technique when selecting teas from the new harvest, in order to understand the tea fully, from aroma to taste and mouthfeel. Drinking tea this way also allows you to slowly release the energy of tea, which in turn allows you to maintain energy throughout the day. The experience is both stimulating and relaxing.

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Corinne brought out some special fermented tea called “puerh,” at the end. She explained you can actually get “tea drunk” if you drink too much and especially if you are not used to it. Again, drinking it slowly over several very short steeps, will offer a pleasant journey. Some of these teas can be steeped at least 12 times and often more than 15.

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The 4th tea we had was made in the year 2009. “Purple Tip” “shou,” or cooked, puerh. It was musty and sweet and very calming. We agreed to set a future date for another tea party event and I can’t wait to have tea with Corinne again! I was pretty high by the time I left.

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CORINNE TRANG
Award-winning Author, Chef, Consultant, Holistic Health and Nutrition Counselor, Tea Purveyor
Skype: “corinnetrang”

Cell: 917-657-0193
Email: ct@corinnetrang.com

www.corinnetrang.com

http://amzn.to/pev7hE

www.liquidgoldtea.com

Corinne Trang is the award-winning author of several books including the most recently published “Switch It Up: A Fresh Take on Quick and Easy Diabetes-Friendly Recipes for a Balanced Life” (2017), “Asian Flavors Diabetes Cookbook” (ADA, 2012), “Noodles Every Day” (2009), “Curry Cuisine” (2007), “The Asian Grill” (2006), “A Food Lover’s Companion: Vietnamese” (2006),” “Essentials of Asian Cuisine” (2003), and “Authentic Vietnamese Cooking” (1999), and has contributed to many more including “The Encyclopedia of Food & Culture” (Scribners & Sons, 2006). She has served as spokesperson to various national brands and commodities such as Kame and Thai Kitchen. Dubbed the “Julia Child of Asian Cuisine” by the Washington Post, she is a frequent television and radio guest and has appeared on national, regional, and cable network including NBC’s Today Show, CBS’s Early Morning Show, PBS, FOX News, ABC, CNN, Lifetime, Discovery, Food Network, Sirius, Business Talk Radio, National Public Radio, and Bloomberg to name a few. She has written for numerous publications including Saveur, Food & Wine, Fine Cooking, Islands, Gourmet, Cooking Light, and Bon Appetit, and has taught and lectured internationally. She has worked as a food consultant to not-for-profits, developing mindful cooking workshops for children and adults alike. She maintains a holistic health and nutrition practice integrating yoga, meditation, and mindful food practices. Trang is also the founder of Liquid Gold Tea,  a wholesale and retail source for handcrafted premium whole leaf tea, Gong Fu Cha tea service, Cha Dao meditation, private instruction and custom tea events.
Corinne Trang is a member of Les Dames d’Escoffier, NY Chapter. 

Here is the 2018 Tea schedule for lessons and events with Corinne Trang:

Get in touch for details…

 

🍵 January 20 & 21 – Pop-up T-Bar & Shop
Northern Grade Barn Days, Bruceville Road, High Falls, NY 12440

from 11 AM to 6:00 PM – free tasting

🍵 January 27 – Healing with Tea

Cook Space Brooklyn603 Bergen Street, Suite 202, Brooklyn, NY 11238

from 1 PM to 4 PM – workshop RSVP 718-230-8400

🍵 January 28 – Cha Dao, The Way of Tea

Whole Sky Yoga10 Old Rt 213, Ste 2S, High Falls, NY

from 1 to 4 PM – workshop RSVP 845-706-3668

🍵 February 1 – The Power of Tea for Good Health
sponsored by The Roundout Valley Holistic Health Community
Stone Ridge, NY Free event

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bluecashew kitchen homestead

37b North Front Street, Kingston, NY

for details, and to RSVP for workshops, call 845 514 2300

🍵 February 4 – In- store Tea Tasting, 11 AM to 6 PM – free tasting

🥑 February 17 – Oodles of Noodles, 1 PM to 4 PM – workshop

🍵 February 18 – Tea 101: History, Origins & Tasting, 1 PM to 4 PM – workshop

🥑 February 24 – Dumplings and Spring Rolls, 1 PM to 4 PM – workshop

🥑 March 3, 2018 – Wok This Way, 1 PM to 4 PM – workshop

🥑 March 10, 2018 – Yakitori & The Art of Japanese Grilling, 1 PM to 4 PM – workshop

🥑 🍵 March 18 – Cheese & Tea: A Farm To Table Tasting, 1 PM to 4 PM – workshop

🥑 March 24, 2018 – Congee: China to Japan, Vietnam to India, 1 PM to 4 PM – workshop

 

More events coming up!

be sure to subscribe for updates at

www.corinnetrang.com and www.liquidgoldtea.com

 

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Dining with Outlaws Screen Test 01

We’re gearing up to start shooting episodes of my fabulous namesake show: Dining with Outlaws! Here’s the first video. It’s a screen test. More to come! Yay it’s finally happening!

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The Sioux Chef’s Indigenous Kitchen

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Cider-Braised Turkey Thighs

I first heard about the Sioux Chef about a year ago when I started following the Standing Rock posts in social media. For me, it’s been an awakening experience- seeing the world through the perception of the Indigenous Peoples of America. After following Standing Rock and the Tribes from North Dakota, I started seeing other Indigenous People from around the world differently. That missing element, the mysteries of the world’s peoples became clearer than I’ve ever known. I’ve always been drawn to different cuisines, native garments, languages, and travel- but for some odd reason I must confess, I’ve never liked American culture. America seemed to lack culture, despite it’s 200-year old history. It needed something beyond the surface.

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Sage and Rose-Hip Roasted Duck; Maple-Sage Roasted Vegetables; Wild Rice Pilaf with Wild Mushrooms, Roasted Chestnuts, and Dried Cranberries; Cranberry Sauce.

I’ve been rebellious against everything I’ve been taught for a reason- something was awfully wrong with the big picture. I finally found that missing element last year when I learned Thanksgiving is actually a celebratory feast of ransacking Native villages. It used to be celebrated all the time, throughout the entire year until Abraham Lincoln dismissed all the little Thanksgivings and turned it into a national holiday. I haven’t looked back since discovering this little secret and can’t help not getting as excited about Thanksgiving anymore. Instead, I prefer to celebrate the beauty of the Native cultures which brings me to introduce to you, The Sioux Chef’s Indigenous Kitchen cookbook authored by Sean Sherman with Beth Dooley. Some of the ingredients were hard for me to source, so I remained to cooking the recipes with ingredients that are easier to find in my neck of the woods- Northern New Jersey. To my amazement, the recipes were easy, simple, and utilized a lot of the vegetables I’ve always used, except everything had an earthiness I haven’t sensed before. I can’t even begin to describe it- you can’t write it into words, it’s something you just sense. I recreated a Thanksgiving meal with a fresh killed duck ordered from Gofle Road Poultry Farm. The spices used include Juniper and Sage. Instead of cooking the traditional Colonial American Sweet Potatoes or Mashed Potatoes recipe, I made Wild Rice Pilaf. Here is where I started to recognize the Indigenous flavors of wilderness and fresh cranberries. The cranberry sauce from the cans and bottles seem rather profane compared to the fresh and natural hunters and gatherers version.

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Amaranth Crackers and a Bean dip I developed and made to accompany it.

At one point during this week long cookbook review process- I ventured outdoors to a nearby recreational park looking for acorns but to no luck, I was confronted by hissing squirrels and no acorn supply. I had amaranth in my pantry forever and never knew what to make with it. Here it is cooked (boiled) and then baked off in the oven for about an hour. The end result is a wholegrain cracker like you’ve never had before. I am seeing where the marriage of different cultures stems from after reading and cooking off some of these recipes. I envisioned the Indigenous tribes sharing the three sisters with the Colonists and enslaved Africans. I see the influence in Southern Cuisine, in Mexican cuisine, and throughout Latin American cuisines. It was an absolute delight to see the source of our cultural history and I can’t wait to discover more recipes in the future! You won’t find butter or cattle or even chicken recipes. You’ll find recipes based on the plants and animals that are Indigenous to America, just as they were before the mass immigration wave from Europe began. This cookbook will help you connect to where you’re living if you are here like I am, looking to find new ways of rediscovering your surroundings. For me this cookbook means more than a recipe collection. It’s a piece of America we’ve been longing for and missing. I’ve never felt more American than I do right now, embracing this Indigenous food with the native plants and wildlife that nourishes our bodies.

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Summer’s Vegetable Soup with Wild Greens

The Sioux Chef is cooking off an Indigenous Feast at the Sioux Chef at James Beard House on October 27th. Tickets cost $135 for members and $170 for the general public. You can get a copy of the Sioux Chef’s Indigenous Kitchen cookbook via Amazon here.

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Filed under Cookbook Reviews, Dinners at the James Beard House 2017, Recipes, Restaurants, Special Events, Spirit Cooking, Uncategorized